Ancestry Adventures

New Ancestry DNA feature

Hello there,

As the title says, Ancestry has a new DNA feature. The new DNA feature is “Genetic Communities”, at the moment it’s in beta.

The new DNA feature “Genetic Communities” looks quite cool!

This is what my Genetic Community is

genetic-community

Comment from Debbie Cruwys Kennett (via PM to me, cos I was talking to her about it)
“The main advantage is that it filters your matches. We’re more likely to find connections with people in the communities.” (I have her ok to repost)

genetic-community-map

Was most interesting to note that my Mother only had 1 Genetic Community, I had expected my Mother to also have an Asian Genetic Community, (is there is such a grouping).

I think what WOULD be interesting is seeing what other “Genetic Communities” there are, is there a list somewhere?

Here are a few “Genetic Communities” from the few people who have shared there DNA matches with me.

English in the West Midlands

Scots
Munster Irish

Central Europeans

Settlers of Colonial New England
Early Settlers of the Deep South

What are/is YOUR Genetic Communities? (if your have this feature)

That’s all I have for now, so till next time, stay tuned for some more Ancestry Adventures!

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A bit of info regard “Genetic Communities”

genetic-community-info-box

genetic-community-faq

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3 thoughts on “New Ancestry DNA feature

  1. Great post Ania, looking forward to when this feature is available to everyone. 😉

    Like

  2. debbiekennett on said:

    Here are some other groups that I have from my kits:

    English in East Anglia and Essex

    Jews in Lithuania, Latvia and Belarus

    Mormon Pioneers in the Northern West

    Settlers of East Northern Carolina and the Tennessee-Kentucky Border

    Settlers of New England and the Eastern Great Lakes

    Like

  3. Hi, I just got this today also have West Midlands and English in Yorkshire and Pennines. That’s spot on I really like the new feature and thanks for the list of areas covered, I was wondering what might be involved. Rather like the historical context section as well.

    Like

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